Lewis, George Washington, papers George Washington Lewis papers MSS 16413

George Washington Lewis papers MSS 16413


[logo]

Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library
P.O. Box 400110
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4110
URL: https://small.library.virginia.edu/

Sharon Defibaugh

Repository
Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library
Identification
MSS 16413
Title
George Washington Lewis papers1805-1906, 1966
URL:
https://archives.lib.virginia.edu/ark:/59853/104766
Quantity
.75 Cubic Feet, 2 boxes; 1 legal document box and 1 half-size legal document box., Roughly 0.75 cubic feet of material
Condition Description
Good.
Creator
Lewis, George Washington, 1804-1879
Language
English .

Administrative Information

Conditions Governing Use

This collection is open for research.

Preferred Citation

George Washington Lewis papers, MSS 16413, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

This collection was given to the University of Virginia Special Collections Library by Betty Works Fuller, a descendant of George Washington Lewis, on April 5, 2018. These papers were received by Lucy Robb Winston Works (1916-2016) from several members of her family and she preserved them as a collection.


Biographical / Historical

Judge George Washington Lewis (1803/4-1879) was born at "Shellfield," Colonial Beach, Virginia, and died at "Claymont," Westmoreland County, Virginia, the son of Samuel Lewis (1780-1840) and Sarah Attaway Miller (1785-1822) and grandson of George Lewis (1757-1821) and Catherine Daingerfield (1784-1820). Lewis was a lawyer, educated at the University of Virginia. He was married first to Jane Brockenbrough Lewis (1810-1849) and they had six children: Anna Louisa Lewis (1830-1897); Henry Bankhead Lewis (1831-1862); Dr. Thomas M. Lewis (1833-1910); Samuel Lewis (1836-1849); Robert Byrd Lewis (1841-1897) and Lucy Pratt Lewis Funsten (1844-1909). His second wife was Lucy Anne Robb (1823-1891) and they had two children, Jane Vivian Lewis Long (1858-1931) and Alice Maria Lewis Wallace (1861-190).

Content Description

The George Washington Lewis papers consists chiefly of correspondence to and from George Washington Lewis and between other family members, but also includes a few photographs of the Lewis family and the homes of "Claymont", "Shellfield" and "Marmion"; a plat of "Claymont"; newsclippings; notes on Lewis family history and genealogy; and a few financial and legal documents.

Arrangement

The collection has been arranged in two series, Correspondence and the Lewis family miscellany files. The correspondence is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the correspondent.

Subjects and Indexing Terms

  • Lewis family
  • Manuscripts (documents)
  • Politics and government
  • Slavery--United States -- Virginia
  • Slavery--United States--History--19th Century
  • Whig Party (Va.)
  • enslaved persons
  • enslavement
  • letters (correspondence)
  • photographs

Content Warning

This material contains racist language or imagery. The purpose of this note is to give users the opportunity to decide whether they need or want to view these materials, or at least, to mentally or emotionally prepare themselves to view the materials. For archival materials, more specific information about these materials may be available in the finding aid.

Container List

Archival Resource Key
Correspondence
  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 1 Archival Resource Key
    Representative Thomas H. Bayly (1810-1856) to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1854 August 6
    Scope and Contents

    Bayly discusses the handling of the case of Molly Butler and his lack of time for correspondence due to his work on the Foreign Affairs Committee and his poor health.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 2 Archival Resource Key
    W.A. Baynham To Mrs. Lucy Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1879 April 12
    Scope and Contents

    This is a letter of condolence upon the death of George Washington Lewis.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 3 Archival Resource Key
    T. H. Botts to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1850 March 5
    Scope and Contents

    Sends a note saying that Willis and family have been delayed due to an accident to their carriage and sends personal regards from Mary Berkeley.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 4 Archival Resource Key
    John W. Brockenbrough (1806-1877), Lexington, Virginia, to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1859 November 15
    Scope and Contents

    Brockenbrough welcomes "the young Mr. McDaniel" recommended by Lewis into his class at the Lexington Law School for instruction and has sent him one of his Law School circulars.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 5 Archival Resource Key
    M. J. T. Burke to Dear Mrs. Snowden
    1 folder(s)
    1889? April 16
    Scope and Contents

    Burke sends a brief note about the life of Fielding Lewis and refers to the "Samoan disaster" account in "The Washington Post."

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 6 Archival Resource Key
    Francis Burt (1807-1854), Auditor of the U.S. Treasury Department, to Representative Thomas Henry Bayly (1810-1856)
    1 folder(s)
    1854 July 24
    Biographical / Historical

    Francis Burt served in the South Carolina General Assembly for twelve years, 1832-1844. In 1853 he was appointed an auditor at the U.S. Treasury Department. In 1854, Burt was selected by President Pierce as the first Governor of the Nebraska Territory but died just a few days after taking the oath of office.

    Scope and Contents

    He writes that he is forwarding the amount owed for the pension of Molly Butler up to her death on June 13, 1852, through Representative Bayly to George Washington Lewis, who is the administrator of Butler's estate.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 7 Archival Resource Key
    Professor Henry Clay Cameron (1827-1906) to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1856-1857
    Scope and Contents

    Cameron requests a letter of recommendation from Lewis for the recently created position of Chair of Greek and Hebrew at the University of Virginia, August 4, 1856. In his second letter, June 23, 1857, Princeton, New Jersey, he shares his plans to sail for Europe in a week, where he will spend about a year to travel and study.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 8 Archival Resource Key
    John Campbell to Samuel Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1820 August 22 and 1823 October 31
    Scope and Contents

    John Campbell writes in great detail about the settlement of the estate of the father of Samuel Lewis, the claims of Lewis for enslaved persons willed to him by his father and a reference to others captured by the British (during the War of 1812?) and the need to secure the future of "Bushfield Plantation" which will have to be sold.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 9 Archival Resource Key
    James M. Carlisle to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1841 January 15
    Scope and Contents

    Supplies the names of two merchant tailors, Charles H. Lane and William Tucker, that he had omitted in his previous letter (not present), for their legal claim against Mastin Davis?, that he is sending to Lewis.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 10 Archival Resource Key
    John Armistead Carter (1808-1890), "Crednal" near Upperville, to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1851 September 12 and 1851 November 20
    Scope and Contents

    John Armistead Carter writes to Lewis for help with business arrangements with tenants on his property near Lewis, especially in collecting the rent from Mr. Baker. This concern continues into his second letter, where he responds to the information sent to him by Lewis, but he also discusses the possible sale of one of his enslaved men, William, who is around 41 years old. William's enslaved brother, Enoch, is a few years older and belongs to E. Conway. Carter asks Lewis to tell him what he can get for him, if he can find a good master, as "I would not sell him to the traders."

    He tries to cheer up Lewis in political matters, urging all leaders to promote education and express a sympathic attitude of helpfulness to the masses, with a regular and efficent system of government. He also writes about his religious views at length. Carter returns to political topics, declaring that he is not a candidate himself. Carter served in the Virginia House of Delegates both before and after the Civil War, representing the Loudoun district.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 11 Archival Resource Key
    Robert Wormeley Carter II (1792-1861), "Sabine Hall," to George Washington Lewis, 3 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1846-1858
    Biographical / Historical

    As shown in these three letters, "In 1846 and again ten years later there were efforts to pull Carter out of political retirement, the first time as Whig nominee for the State Senate, the second as Union Candidates for Congress (Virginia's 8th District). In each instance Carter politely but firmly declined to be a candidate. See, for example, his letter to the "Richmond Whig", July 21, 1856" (quoted from a note from the finding aid for MSS 1959, -a, -c in UVA Special Collections).

    Scope and Contents

    Carter, while declining to be a candidate for political office, expresses grave concern over the recent action by the United States, termed by him the "rapid acquisition of foreign territory by the proclamation of our royal masters pro-consuls? What has become of the Constitution, and those who were so zealous in its defense?" in his letter of December 10, 1846.

    In his letter, March 26, 1857, he protests the creation of abolitionist territories and states from public lands by Congress without reference to specific documents or acts, dates and the amounts of such lands transferred from the "common treasury" and the resulting disadvantages to the "old states" as a result.

    The third letter continues the discussion about the territories, their constitutions, and their eventual admission to the United States, his surprise over the recent election in Kansas on the slavery provision in their constitution, and the lack of interesting bills in the Legislature (1858 January 2).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 12 Archival Resource Key
    Samuel Lewis Casey (1821-1902) to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1856 January 31
    Scope and Contents

    Agrees with the apprehensive assessment of Lewis about the state of domestic relations in the United States and abroad but fears the worst situation is at home. He points to the "spring occurrences in Kansas" and fears that the consequences will be dire. He also believes that "the North will send men, money and arms" to Kansas to promote a "bloody collision." Casey writes that he believes that the Martin Van Buren platform of 1848 laid the groundwork for the current state of things, interrupted briefly by the Compromise of 1850-1851. He believes that the only ones to benefit from the "Know Nothing" party will be the "Black Republicans." He closes with personal regards and news.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 13 Archival Resource Key
    R. A. Claybrook, Richmond, Virginia, to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1856 March 6
    Scope and Contents

    Tells Lewis that the proposition contained in the last two letters from Lewis to him cannot be pushed through the General Assembly at the end of the session because almost everyone has gone home. A similar proposal faced opposition during the session. Claybrook says that Chairman Pendleton has promised to pursue it in the next session in the winter. He also refers to the passage of a bill in the House on March 4th concerning the escape of fugitive enslaved persons and "the rights and disabilities of free negroes." Claybrook also writes in detail about the prospects of Millard Fillmore and other candidates for the Presidential election and disagrees with Lewis that the Union is in danger.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 14 Archival Resource Key
    Attorney Mastin? Davis to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1855? January 17
    Scope and Contents

    Davis agrees to take up the lawsuit of Carter v. Taylor, should the pending negotiations fail.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 15 Archival Resource Key
    F. Dickinson, Bowling Green, Virginia, to Daingerfield Lewis (1785-1862)
    1 folder(s)
    1832 December 1
    Scope and Contents

    Dickinson represents two sisters, Mrs. Gray and Mrs. Bankhead, in the sale of three fourths of a tract of land in Caroline County. He writes to Daingerfield Lewis as the executor of George Lewis, who was owner of one of the fourths of the tract of land. He asks if Lewis will commit to a division of the tract or agree to a sale of the land as a unit and asks him to send written instructions in his role as the executor of George Lewis.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 16 Archival Resource Key
    Thomas Harding Ellis, President of the James River and Kanawha Company, to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1860
    Scope and Contents

    Asks for advice from Lewis on how to best present his proposal for the James River and Kanawha Canal before the Legislature in his first letter and thanks him for his advice in his second letter.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 17 Archival Resource Key
    Edward Everett (1794-1865), Boston, to and from George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1860 May 24 and 26
    Scope and Contents

    Edward Everett, May 26, 1860, thanks Lewis for sending him one of George Washington's autograph letters which he terms "a precious relic." With Everett's letter is a hand-written draft copy of G.W. Lewis' original letter, May 24, 1860, sent to Edward Everett when he mailed the Washington letter as an enclosure. In that letter, he expresses a great deal of appreciation for Everett's character and political career.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 18 Archival Resource Key
    Benjamin Stoddert Ewell (1810-1894), Williamsburg, to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1859? November 22
    Scope and Contents

    Benjamin Stoddert Ewell, president of William and Mary, writes concerning the college fees and progress of Robert Byrd Lewis, the son of George Washington Lewis, as a student at William and Mary.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 19 Archival Resource Key
    John M. Forbes, "Middlesex," to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1849 April 11-12
    Scope and Contents

    Forbes is running for office as a Whig candidate against Mr. Holladay and attempts to explain to Lewis and other voters why he is speaking at the Spotsylvania Court House instead of the Westmoreland Court House. In his second letter, Forbes expresses his opposition to the Northern men who are trying to enforce their anti-slavery views in the Territories and using direct taxation upon enslaved persons to attempt to bring about the destruction of the practice of enslavement.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 20 Archival Resource Key
    Gales and Seaton, publishers and printers of "The National Intelligencier," to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1853 February 4
    Scope and Contents

    Declines to publish an article by Lewis in its present form which criticizes a sculpture by Horatio Greenough. Greenough was just recently deceased.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 21 Archival Resource Key
    Correspondence of Dr. C.E. Godfrey, New Jersey Office of Adjutant General, to Lucy Lewis Funsten and Attaway M. Lewis about Captain George Lewis, 7 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1902-1907
    Scope and Contents

    Godfrey requests any information about Captain George Lewis (1757-1821), an officer in the Commander-in-Chief's Guard, and his family, or a likeness or image of Lewis, for his book "The Commander-in-Chief's Guard, Revolutionary War" (1902); thanks her for allowing him to photograph the payroll of Captain Lewis' troop, which is the only one in existence and warns her about the need for its care, also sharing the interest of Mr. Ford, Library of Congress, in its purchase (January 8, 1903).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 22 Archival Resource Key
    James M. Goggin to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1854 September 25
    Scope and Contents

    Encloses a letter (not present) from their mutual friend, Henry P. Irving of Richmond, Virginia, and expresses the hope of still meeting Lewis before leaving the county.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 23 Archival Resource Key
    William T. Goggin to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1859 June 16
    Scope and Contents

    Despite his loss in the recent political contest, Goggin is thankful for the formation of new friendships and the renewal of old friendships, none more than his with Lewis.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 24 Archival Resource Key
    Horace Edwin Hayden (1837-1917), Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, to Miss Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1893 August 28
    Scope and Contents

    Writes a detailed letter about the Lewis genealogy in the United States and explains why he cannot use her Lewis data in his book.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 25 Archival Resource Key
    Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter (1809-1887) to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1846 April 6 and 1862 July 8
    Scope and Contents

    Expresses his concern that Lewis had not received his second letter containing the papers which he returned since nothing more could be done with them at his office and he was afraid he would misplace them (April 6, 1846). Hunter plans on sending a letter to Confederate President Jefferson Davis with the valuable information that Lewis has sent. The Virginia generals expect the enemy to send troops from Fredericksburg to General George McClellan but will not know it until they receive the news through Lewis. He believes that McClellan is probably preparing for another effort but where he will re-organize his forces was a matter of doubt when Hunter left Richmond (July 8, 1862).

  • Mixed Materials [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 26 Archival Resource Key
    Thomas Jefferson to George Washington Lewis, Typescript copy
    1 folder(s)
    1825 October 25
    Scope and Contents

    Provides a detailed list of historical authors to read and study for a good grasp of history, and an elementary work for law, written to Lewis as a student at the University of Virginia.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 27 Archival Resource Key
    Amos Kindale, 4th Auditor, to Simon Snooks, "A Poetical Epistle"
    1 folder(s)
    undated
  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 28 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis and others to Secretary of the Navy, George E. Badger (1795-1866), 7 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1841
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis wrote to Badger April 2, 1841, concerning his application to fill the Navy agent vacancy at Pensacola, Florida. His letter was accompanied by a petition signed by friends and supporters recommending Lewis for the job.

    Also present are letters from individuals to either President Tyler or Secretary Badger, including John M. Botts, Thomas H. Botts, Thomas Miller, and William Henry Washington, all April 1841, and a letter to Lewis from Willoughby? Newton, April 24, 1841, indicating that he has also written to the President in support.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 29 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to Richard Baylor
    1 folder(s)
    1855 June 30
    Scope and Contents

    Since the harvest has been so good, he asks Baylor to send a contribution to help the ladies' fund extricate the local neighborhood church from indebtedness.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 30 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to his daughter, Alice Maria Lewis Wallace
    1 folder(s)
    1875-1877
    Scope and Contents

    These letters include a warning against homesickness while away at Mrs. McGuire's Boarding School, their closeness to her through letters and travel, and news of their community and friends (October 15, 1875); gives permission for her to come home at Christmas if Etta comes home as well (December 9, 1875); a discussion about her mistakes in letter writing and family news (March 28, 1876); sends money to pay for her washing while at school and expects her uncle Henry from Baltimore to visit (December 4, 1876); his uneasiness over her health and disparaging remarks about some Negroes who supposedly stole a large amount of bacon from his meat house (January 26, 1877); sends her money to pay for his subscription to a paper and hopes to see her at Easter (February 9, 1877); and sends rules for speaking and writing, several books for her studies and family news (October 11, 1877).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 31 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to his son, Henry Bankhead Lewis, 9 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1849-1850, 1861
  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 32 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to his wife, Jane Brockenbrough Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1843 January 5
    Scope and Contents

    In this incomplete letter, Lewis asks whether the enslaved man William arrived home safely with the items he sent from Fredericksburg. He then reflects upon the distress of the family he left behind due to the long illness and sudden death of Betty Washington Lewis Ashton? (1816-1843) and the poor helpless infants she left behind. Lewis urges Jane to not forget to renew the supply of provisions to the enslaved people at home and to send the enslaved man William to "Claymont" for a cart to bring the enslaved woman Aggy home. Lewis plans to hire her out when he comes home and asks if Fielding will hire her out for him before then if he can.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 33 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to his daughter, Louisa Lewis, 4 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1843, 1849, 1863
    Scope and Contents

    His first letter speaks of his plans to educate Louisa as well as her brothers (January 22, 1843); Lewis complains about the lack of letters from Louisa while he has been in Berkeley Springs and talks about the loss of both his wife Jane and son Sam during the summer, his sorrow, and his poor health (September 3, 1849); Lewis has returned to Washington from Bath Springs and gives an account of his travels and of the family around Washington (September 6, 1849); Lewis describes his visit to his son Tom, in his camp at Petersburg, Virginia,where he found his tent to be insufficient for winter. Lewis discusses his hope for Tom's transfer to Richmond, and his introduction of Tom to Senator Collier from Petersburg. Lewis is thankful they have heard from Byrd and that he is well, since the cavalry has undergone the heaviest fighting so far. He mentions the deaths of St. Tomas Tayloe and Captain Newton, shares all the news about General Lee's front that he knows, says that he doesn't expect a decisive campaign in northern Virginia this fall and fears the loss of Tennessee, the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad and the South's saltworks. Also writes that the various quarrels between the Confederate generals could be disastrous and fears the rapid depreciation of Confederate money (October 20, 1863).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 34 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to his wife, Lucy Anne Robb Lewis, 5 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1857-1873
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis writes to Lucy while she is away visiting her mother and sister Eliza, mentions neighborhood news and refers to two enslaved servants, Brooks who is repairing the kitchen and Margaret who he has had difficulties hiring out (December 31, 1857); writing from the Richmond Senate chamber, Lewis tells of unfavorable news for the Confederacy, mentions the capture of Cumberland Gap, the burning of Bristol, the presence of seven regiments of cavalry, which were cutting off General Jones, forcing Lee to fall back to Richmond and leaving most of Virginia undefended. Lewis states that he may not be able to get home for a while and shares that the Legislature was busy drafting measures for defending the state, calling upon all men 45-60 to be enlisted, including physicians. He tells Lucy to plan on the safest place to stay should the enemy forces overrun the state (September 21, 1863).

    Lewis describes his visit to his son, Dr. Thomas Lewis, at White Post, Clarke County, for the recovery of his health, including the beauty of the Shenandoah Valley, his homesickness, meeting several persons including the Snowdens and Bishop Meade's family, his son's medical practice, his wife Maria and son, and his anxiety at not hearing from home (August 26 and September 2, 1872).

    Lewis describes a visit to Charlottesville where he was the oldest alumnus present, meeting his college friend, Governor Swann there. He mentions the speech of Senator Bayard of Delaware, dinner at Professor Minor's, the alumni dinner on the third where he sat with Johnson Barbour and heard many wonderful speakers, excepting the one by his friend Governor Swann who had previously enjoyed too much alcohol at Professor Mallet's. Professor Minor recalled Henry Byrd as a diligent student and Professor Socrates Maupin, who had served with Byrd in the 9th Virginia Cavalry, and also sent his regards (July 5, 1873).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 35 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to his son, Dr. Thomas M. Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1877 June 20
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis writes to his son after a visit and says how much he misses him and Georgie, his only grandchild. Hopes that he will have a hand in his education when the time comes. States that his family is his chief comfort in old age.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 36 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to his grandmother, Sarah A. ("Sally") Miller, Albany, Westmoreland County, Virginia, 3 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1818-1835
    Scope and Contents

    Writes from "Clifton Hill," Morganfield, Kentucky, as a young boy of family news (March 20, 1818); from White Sulphur Springs (January 28, 1822) and from "Claymont" as a grown man writing of the safe arrival of his Aunt Harriet (October 29, 1835).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 37 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to Robert E. Scott
    1 folder(s)
    1852 May 7
    Scope and Contents

    Discusses in detail the recent Whig Convention and the need for the Northern part of the Whig party to honor the Compromise and enforce the laws concerning fugitive enslaved persons laws or have a different organization altogether. But Lewis also does not want to coalesce with the Democratic party. He feels that Fillmore would come the nearest of getting the Virginia vote.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 38 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to Miss Julia Tayloe, Powhatan
    1 folder(s)
    1854 January 12
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis thanks her for her beautiful New Year's gift.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 39 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington Lewis to "Dear Sir"
    1 folder(s)
    1830 October 2
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis discusses in detail the possibility of increasing Henry Clay's popularity in Virginia and other political details.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 40 Archival Resource Key
    Henry Bankhead Lewis to family, his father George Washington Lewis and sister Louisa, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1846 March 28 and 1861 July 10
    Biographical / Historical

    Henry Bankhead Lewis was killed in the Battle of Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862.

    Scope and Contents

    Henry writes a brief letter to his sister Louisa who is away at school and staying with the Millers, which includes a long postscript from George Washington Lewis to his daughter (March 28, 1846).Henry Lewis writes to George Washington Lewis from Camp Hooe? to acknowledge his father's letter and the sword that he sent him. Henry describes the life of a soldier while on duty guarding the Point, which is about six miles from Winsor, standing picket duty for 24 hours at a time and camping rough with only brush and planks as protection from the weather and subject to annoyance from ticks, chiggers, mosquitoes, and other insects. He also mentions the complaining in camp, lack of discipline in the ranks and lack of fortification with cannon on the Point. He mentions that he is part of the 47th Regiment under Lt. Colonel William Green,and he predicts a long and severe war (July 10, 1861).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 41 Archival Resource Key
    Henry Howell Lewis (1817-1898), Norfolk, USS Vandalia, "Home Squadron" to his brother, George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1843 September 14
    Scope and Contents

    Characterizes his most recent voyage as disagreeable and uninteresting. The purpose of the voyage was to transport Commodore Dallas to Chagres in New Granada, where he then made his way across the Isthmus of Panama to his new ship on the Pacific side, accompanied by Murat Willis. His ship remained in Chagres for two months and Lewis describes the area, its people of mixed ancestry, the long rainy season, unhealthy conditions, the presence of leprosy, and luxuriant vegetation. Later they sailed for Kingston, Jamaica, with English officers as passengers who showed them hospitality. Lord Elgin and Kincardine (1811-1863) was the Governor of the island. Afterwards they returned to Chagres and then home.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 42 Archival Resource Key
    Henry Howell Lewis (1817-1898), Baltimore, Maryland, to Lucy Lewis Funsten and Louisa Lewis, 6 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1885-1892
    Scope and Contents

    Henry H. Lewis writes concerning family genealogy and news. He also mentions his health issues and issues invitations to visit.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 43 Archival Resource Key
    Jane Brockenbrough Lewis (1810-1849) to her daughter, Anna Louisa Lewis, 3 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1844, 1846
    Scope and Contents

    Jane Lewis writes to her daughter Louisa who is staying with her uncle Dr. Thomas Miller and Aunt Virginia Miller (1844) and William Miller (1846) while attending school in Washington. She includes news of the family and neighborhood.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 44 Archival Resource Key
    Louisa Lewis to her father, George Washington Lewis
    1845 December 21
    Scope and Contents

    Louisa Lewis writes her father concerning her tuiton bill at Mrs. I.H. Bure's? dated November 25, 1845.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 45 Archival Resource Key
    Lucy Pratt Lewis (Funsten) to her father, George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1863 February 20
    Scope and Contents

    Note on the letter says that Lucy was visiting her cousin Ella Waring at "Malverne," Essex County, Virginia, while her father was in the Senate in Richmond.

    She regrets his worry over reports of the Yankee visit to their neighborhood while he was away. She assures him that the accounts were exaggerated and that the Yankees have departed after taking as many horses as they could capture, around sixty. Infantry were landed from gunboats which took off grain. "They only had pickets posted at the forks of the roads above Claymont." She then gave him as much news about friends and family that she could.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 46 Archival Resource Key
    Robert Byrd Lewis to his mother, Mrs. Jane B. Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    undated
    Scope and Contents

    He writes a practice letter as a child to his mother and mentions a visit from Mr. Burke and his own desire to go out hunting chestnuts.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 47 Archival Resource Key
    Sarah Attaway (Miller) Lewis (1785-1822), Clifton Hill, Morganfield, Kentucky, to her son, George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    July 14
    Scope and Contents

    She writes while he is away for schooling, praises him for his progress in learning and promises to send both her sons money when they have some.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 48 Archival Resource Key
    Sarah Attaway (Miller) Lewis (1785-1822), Willis Hill, to her mother, Sarah ("Sally") Buckner Miller, Port Royal, Virginia
    1 folder(s)
    1816 September 4
    Scope and Contents

    Assures her mother that all are well after their arrival at Willis Hill a week ago but are anxious to hear how everyone is at Port Royal. She complains that she has not received any letters from the girls since their return from "Albany." She mentions that John and Eliza go to school in town with Miss Judy Clark.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 49 Archival Resource Key
    Thomas Miller Lewis, "Claymont" to his sister, Louisa Lewis, Washington
    1 folder(s)
    1845 November 23
    Scope and Contents

    Thomas wishes his sister would come home since he misses her, mentions sickness in the family, schooling while at home, and news of friends and relatives. Includes a note from her father, George Washington Lewis as well (November 24, 1845).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 50 Archival Resource Key
    William Terrell Lewis (1811-1893), Louisville, Mississippi, to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1858 April 2
    Scope and Contents

    A very long letter full of genealogical questions to answer and supplying some information about the Lewis family in the United States. Lewis noted on the letter that he answered it on May 10, 1858, referring him to Bishop Meade's book and John Minor.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 51 Archival Resource Key
    W.W. Lewis, Bagatelle, Logan County, Kentucky, to "Dear Sir"
    1 folder(s)
    1817 August 8
    Scope and Contents

    Notifies him that his father, brother, and family arrived safely in good health, except for Major Lewis who is suffering from gout. He has delivered the enslaved man John to the recipient's brother Sam in Weedon Lick, Union County, Kentucky, according to the instructions in his letter. About the enslaved man John, Lewis writes "John is very much averse to returning to Virginia. In fact, he says he had rather die than return." Because of this, the recipient's father has suggested that his brother Sam is willing to purchase him and send him enough money to buy another enslaved person to replace John.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 52 Archival Resource Key
    Lewis family letters – miscellaneous
    1 folder(s)
    1845-1887, undated
    Scope and Contents

    Includes four letters, chiefly of a social nature, one from an Aunt Maria to Mrs. George W. Lewis (1845 November 9); one from a child describing school activities, signed with initials only (1877 December); "Your loving sister Millie, Nestledown, to "My dear Aunt Lou?, (1887 August 30); and Ella B. Waring?, Glencom?, to her cousin (undated).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 53 Archival Resource Key
    John [Tayloe] Lomax (1781-1862?) to President John Tyler and to George Washington Lewis, 3 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1841, 1852
    Scope and Contents

    John [Tayloe] Lomax (1781-1862?) writes to President John Tyler, recommending George Washington Lewis to be the Navy Agent at Pensacola, Florida (1841 April 22) and to George Washington Lewis about the inquiry of Lewis about the qualifications for Commonwealth's Attorney (1852 June 11 and July 13).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 54 Archival Resource Key
    John L. Marye, Jr., Fredericksburg, to "My dear Sir", George Washington Lewis ?
    1 folder(s)
    1857 December 31
    Scope and Contents

    Marye sympathizes with his lament about the passing away of the former notable men in the legal profession and the loss of character among its participants, and corrects Lewis's misunderstanding about a point he made about manumission, recommending a pamphlet by John Howard of Richmond.

  • Ledgers [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 55 Archival Resource Key
    Major Thomas Matthews, Springfield, Virginia, to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1843 June 22
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis agrees with Matthews that the accusation that his friend Mr. Hunter gambled while attending at the March Court in Westmoreland County in order to give a speech was entirely false and furnishes his own recollection of the occasion.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 56 Archival Resource Key
    Joseph Mayo, Jr. to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    undated
    Scope and Contents

    Mayo thanks Lewis for his good opinion of his recently instituted newspaper, copies of which he had sent out as advertising to several of his friends in the Northern Neck area of Virginia.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 57 Archival Resource Key
    Thomas Miller to his nephew, George Washington Lewis, 3 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1855-1856
    Scope and Contents

    Miller requests an autograph of George Washington for a friend, comments upon the lack of interesting bills before Congress, except for the Judiciary bill concerning the local district, and tells of meeting Lewis' daughter as part of the "Marmion" wedding party (January 1, 1855); shares his suggestion that Thomas, the son of George Washington Lewis, could work with him in the infirmary, putting up medicines and attending patients, and still attend to his studies for fifty dollars per annum (September 22, 1855); informs Lewis that due to the conditions at his school, Miller has advised Thomas Lewis to go to study at the medical school in Philadelphia right away and has loaned him the medical text books from his office, and he is to be accompanied by Ashton; he is also deeply distressed and mortified by William's behavior; and asks about politics in his area, mentioning several possible outcomes for the Presidential race (September 12, 1856).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 58 Archival Resource Key
    Virginia Miller, near Leesburg, Virginia, to her cousin Lucy Robb Lewis, "Mrs. George Washington Lewis"
    1 folder(s)
    1879 April 26
    Scope and Contents

    Writes a condolence letter upon the death of Lucy's husband, George Washington Lewis.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 59 Archival Resource Key
    John Minor, Fredericksburg, Virginia, to George Washington Lewis, 6 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1848, 1858
    Scope and Contents

    Minor thanks him for the arrival of the books and analyzes an article that Lewis wrote for a newspaper. The quality of the article would have made it more appropriate for a Review and it would have been more appreciated (June 24, 1848). Minor also requests information about a legal case, Belfield vs Vickers, where Lewis represents the defendant (June 27, 1848). He also asks if he knows of an authoritative account of the family of George Washington (January 26, 1858 and undated). Minor sends Lewis information on how to request an insurance policy on his house (February 2, 1858).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 60 Archival Resource Key
    John A. Parker and Joseph Segar to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1847 January 28 and 30
    Scope and Contents

    Both men write for Lewis to support the "Right of Way" bill by writing letters to representatives in the Legislature.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 61 Archival Resource Key
    John M. Patton (1797-1858) to George Washington Lewis, 5 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1834-1854
    Scope and Contents

    Patton discusses the legal case Mcfarlane vs Smith involving the seizure of enslaved persons by Smith and Patton's lack of interest in politics (May 13, 1834); Patton's opinion in regard to a will (December 1, 1835); he expresses his willingness to apply for an appeal in the case referred to by Lewis, but he has not received any information about it (October 16, 1846); supplies information about the case, Young vs Johnson (January 27, 1854); and his opinion about the revival of suits of unlawful detainer in Tennent vs Pipers (July 22, incomplete letter).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 62 Archival Resource Key
    John S. Pendleton (1802-1868), "Redwood" Culpeper County, Virginia, to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1847, 1850
    Scope and Contents

    Pendleton asks Lewis to support fellow Whig, James F. Matthew of Rappahannock for Speaker in the House of Delegates (September 1847). He also asks for Lewis' support if he is offered a position in the Foreign Diplomatic Service by the current Secretary of state (November 8, 1850).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 63 Archival Resource Key
    William M. Peyton (1804-1868), "Elmwood," Roanoke, Virginia, to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1854 August 5
    Scope and Contents

    Asks Lewis to come and visit him.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 64 Archival Resource Key
    William Cabell Rives to George Washington Lewis, 3 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1844, 1856
    Scope and Contents

    Rives thanks Lewis for his kind words about Rives' speech on the Tariff and the views of Lewis about national policy and the presidential election expressed in his letter; writes enthusiastically about Henry Clay, the Whig candidate for President; and the possible support of New York for Clay's election (1844 October 21); in a draft copy, Lewis writes to Rives, who is as one of the Visitors at the University of Virginia, recommending James C. Welling for the Chair of History and General Literature, with his qualifications (1856 December 8); while no longer a Visitor at the University of Virginia, Rives writes that he has placed the recommendation of Lewis, with his own support for Welling, before the Rector (1856 December 8).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 65 Archival Resource Key
    Eliza A. Robb, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to her sister, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1868 and undated
    Scope and Contents

    Describes in great detail her visit to physicians in Philadelphia, their diagnosis of ovarian dropsy, her successful operation and recovery.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 66 Archival Resource Key
    George P. Scar[brough?], Warrenton Springs, to George Washington Lewis, with the draft of Lewis' reply on same letter
    1 folder(s)
    1858 August 9
    Scope and Contents

    Asks Lewis to support his brother-in-law, Edward S. Joynes for the appointment of professor of Greek and Latin at William and Mary if Mr. Barnwell has indeed turned down the appointment.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 67 Archival Resource Key
    Robert E. Scott to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1852 April 17 and 1855 April 25
    Scope and Contents

    The Virginia Whig state convention has just come to its conclusion, with Mr. Fillmore as the first choice of the majority instead of General Winfield Scott who had not come out in favor of "the Compromise." The writer is afraid of a possible break with the northern branch of the Whig party due to their agitation against enslavement and support of "free soil." (April 17, 1852); George Washington Lewis responds that he has been very busy with his court duties but has read and approves of all the resolutions. Lewis also hopes that the North will be "compelled to execute the fugitive slave law faithfully and energetically" and opposes any movement of the Virginia Whigs to unite with the Democrats (1852 May 7).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 68 Archival Resource Key
    John Seddon to George Washington Lewis, with a separate reply from Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1858 May 19 and May 22
    Scope and Contents

    Recommends his nephew, Edwin Taliaferro, for the Chair of Modern Languages at William and Mary College, with his qualifications (1858 May 19) and Lewis, as the newest member of the Board of Visitors there, suggests having associates and friends from the Richmond area also forward recommendations on Taliaferro's behalf (1858 May 22).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 69 Archival Resource Key
    R.B. Semple to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1848 ? May 21
    Scope and Contents

    Asks if Lewis will write editorials for his newspaper in return for free issues and discusses the upcoming Democratic? Convention in Baltimore, Maryland, with Andrew Stevenson (1784-1857) as their speaker, to nominate a presidential candidate for the 1848? election.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 70 Archival Resource Key
    Hugh White Sheffey (1815-1889), Staunton, Virginia, to Dangerfield Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1841 April 30
    Scope and Contents

    Sheffey writes to Dangerfield Lewis and his brother, Samuel Lewis, concerning the possibility of recovering lands presently in the state of Kentucky patented to his father, George Lewis, for a fee. The lands had been forfeited due to non-payment of taxes.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 71 Archival Resource Key
    Alexander H.H. Stuart to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    undated
    Scope and Contents

    Declines to interfere in the selection of clerks for the various bureaus under his authority, concerning the request by Colonel Hungerford for an appointment. Lewis had sent a recommendation for Hungerford to Stuart.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 72 Archival Resource Key
    Dr. Richard Henry Stuart to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1856 February 15
    Scope and Contents

    Stuart sends Jim, probably an enslaved worker who is anxious to see his family, to Lewis. Jim travels by horse due to the bad condition of the roads. He will delay his own visit, as his own children have the mumps. He also thanks Lewis for the speech he has sent for his boys to study when they are older.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 73 Archival Resource Key
    Edward T. Tayloe to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1854 October 14 and 1858 May 21
    Scope and Contents

    Tayloe offers to read his essay before Lewis submits it to the Virginia State Agricultural Society for publication (October 14, 1854). He also discusses the date and concerns of an upcoming meeting of the Board of Visitors at William and Mary College (1858 May 21).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 74 Archival Resource Key
    Unknown correspondent to "My dear Sir" involving a legal opinion about the application of a new statute
    1 folder(s)
    1843 June 22
  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 75 Archival Resource Key
    Alice Maria Lewis Wallace letters
    1 folder(s)
    1873 and undated
    Scope and Contents

    Includes two letters, the first from Alice Maria Lewis Wallace to her sister, "Lulu" Louise Lewis? (1873 November 24) and the second an undated draft of her letter to Captain Sooley? about Lewis family history.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 76 Archival Resource Key
    George Washington letters to family members, hand-written copies, 3 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1789 October 12 and 1796 April 7 and 28
    Existence and Location of Originals

    These copies were made presumably by Lucy Lewis Funsten and the location of originals are unknown.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 77 Archival Resource Key
    H.A. Washington to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    "Friday"
    Scope and Contents

    If Lewis plans on attending the next Richmond County Court, Washington asks Lewis if he will take down the enclose bond of David B. Taylor and get the money from him. He also asks if Lewis will give an enclosed letter to Thomas S. Waugh which includes a check.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 78 Archival Resource Key
    Lewis W. Washington (1812-1871), "Beall-Air" to George Washington Lewis, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1855 January 5 and 1858 May 10
    Scope and Contents

    Washington describes his visit to Virginia with Mr. Turner and recalls pleasant memories involving Lewis. He also described the recent visit of Washington Irving to his home where Irving viewed several George Washington documents in his possession (1855 January 5). Regrets his illness has prevented his presence at a meeting with the Governor of Virginia to discuss the arrangements for "embellishing" the birthplace of George Washington and the tomb of his ancestors and a visit with Lewis at his home. He also requests on behalf of his friend, Mr. Turner, that Lewis give Turner the letter from George Washington to Turner's grandfather thanking him for a present of two pistols. In return, Washington promises to send Lewis a letter from Major George Lewis to his uncle, George Washington, endorsed on the back by Washington in his own hand (1858 May 10).

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 79 Archival Resource Key
    John A. Washington, Mr. Vernon, to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1858 July 17
    Scope and Contents

    Washington forwards a letter from a woman to himself, in case Lewis can help her with information that he is unable to provide. The letter from the woman is not present.

  • Manuscripts [X032668026] box: 1 folder: 80 Archival Resource Key
    James C. Welling to George Washington Lewis, 8 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1856-1861
    Scope and Contents

    Regrets that he is unable to attend the wedding of Lewis, due to pressing business in Washington (1856 May 9). Asks for Lewis' letter of support before the Board of Visitors in his nomination as Chair of Literature and History (1856 November 7) which draft copy is present (1856 November 27). Welling thanks Lewis for his support but has received word that the majority of the Board of Visitors support Professor Holmes for the position (1856 December 5); declines to publish his satiric piece on the Patent Office in "The National Intelligencer" for fear it will be used against Mr. Brown himself, urging his removal from office. He also noted that the "Crittenden amendment" prevailed in the House of Representatives on April 1st. (1858 March 31-April 1); thanks Lewis for his political piece that Welling will publish in tomorrow's paper and reveals that he is the author of the "Calm Appeal" addressed to the people of New Jersey and Pennsylvania about the political relations between North and South; mentions his distress at learning Dr. Wirt, Dabney Wirt and Mr. Wilson do not support the John Bell and Edward Everett Constitutional Union Party ticket (1860 August 24); and mentions the "Peace Conference" and his opinion of Abraham Lincoln's Cabinet members (1861 March 8).

  • Manuscripts [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 1 Archival Resource Key
    William and Mary College Board of Visitors, Secretary William McMoody, to George Washington Lewis, about his appointment to the Board, 2 letters
    1 folder(s)
    1858 May 22 and June 28
  • Manuscripts [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 2 Archival Resource Key
    Byrd Charles Willis (1781-1946), Pensacola, Florida, to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1834 December 10
    Scope and Contents

    Willis writes following the death of his wife, Mary W. Lewis Willis (1782-1834) about a guardianship for his son, Achille Murat Willis (1827-1908).

  • Manuscripts [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 3 Archival Resource Key
    Dr. George T. Yerby to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1843 March 31
    Scope and Contents

    Commends his friend, William S. Pawson, Commission Merchant, Baltimore, to Lewis, as an experienced man of the highest respectability and standing, March 31, 1843, accompanying a letter from Pawson himself, June 22, 1843, explaining why he has not yet visited in person and that his chief area of business in Virginia was selling grain from the Eastern Shore.

  • Manuscripts [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 4 Archival Resource Key
    Mary Willis Lewis ? to "My dear brother," George Washington Lewis ?
    1 folder(s)
    1861 October 9
    Biographical / Historical

    The correspondent was probably Mary Willis Lewis (1812-1886), daughter of Major Samuel Lewis, who married John Casey, Union, Kentucky, in 1829. The recipient is probably her brother, George Washington Lewis.

    According to a Wikipedia article about Kentucky in the Civil War, "Kentucky was a border state of key importance in the American Civil War. It officially declared its neutrality at the beginning of the war, but after a failed attempt by Confederate General Leonidas Polk to take the state of Kentucky for the Confederacy, the legislature petitioned the Union Army for assistance."

    Scope and Contents

    Mary discusses the Civil War activity in her state of Kentucky where forces had already begun to break the neutrality established by the governor. She mentions hostile forces under Union General Johnson near Paducah, Kentucky and forces under Confederate General Leonidas Polk; the arrest of ex-Governor Charles S. Morehead and other prominent men; and the numbers of local men who have left the county to join the Confederate army. They have plenty of food but clothing and other goods are hard to get and they are making do with old clothes thought past mending. Mary has also sold eggs for the first time and bought a lamp made in Pittsburgh.

Archival Resource Key
Lewis Family Miscellany Files
  • Mixed Materials [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 5 Archival Resource Key
    Diary Notebook kept by George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1849
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis recorded, in an "Richardson's Virginia and North Carolina Almanac for 1849," agricultural details, church services, weather, the death of his son, Sam, at 13 years on July 1, 1849, and his wife Jane, on July 31, 1849; He also noted that Thomas left for school at Mr. Cameron's at King George Courthouse in September and Harry to Rappahannock Academy in October. Also the printed portions listed judges and elected government officials.

  • Mixed Materials [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 6 Archival Resource Key
    Lewis family Miscellany
    1 folder(s)
    1854-1874
    Scope and Contents

    This includes two financial documents; an engraving of "Memorials of Washington"; a torn printed page about George Washington; a copy of a news clipping about Lewis genealogy; a Civil War document granting permission for 48 hour leave to Captain? Lewis (December 28, 1864); a legal agreement between George Washington Lewis and Riley G. Samuel (March 16, 1874), for the recovery and sale of Green River land in Kentucky; a copy of a childhood poem by Alice Lewis; a writing by George Washington Lewis, giving his opinion about Lord Macauley and his work, to his daughter Alice; and a single used three-cent stamp featuring George Washington.

  • Mixed Materials Flat_Box: Archival Oversized Box S 1 Oversize_Folder(Within_an_OSBox): 1 [X032668028] Archival Resource Key
    Lewis family Miscellany - an American Legal Association membership certificate for George Washington Lewis (oversize)
    1 folder(s)
    1851
  • Manuscripts [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 7 Archival Resource Key
    Memorandum from George Washington Lewis to his daughter, Mrs. Lucy Funsten
    1 folder(s)
    1878 October 16
    Scope and Contents

    The memorandum discusses his lack of knowledge about the Spencer Estate in Great Britain. He also promises to send some of his printed essays for her scrapbook and closes with a postscript about the death of her Uncle, Fielding.

  • Text [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 8 Archival Resource Key
    News clippings concerning the election of George Washington Lewis to the Judgeship
    1 folder(s)
    1857
  • Mixed Materials [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 9 Archival Resource Key
    Notes on Lewis family history
    1 folder(s)
    undated
  • Manuscripts [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 10 Archival Resource Key
    "Obituary Notice of Mrs. Jane Brockenbrough Lewis" written out and sent to Miss Louisa Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1849 September 7
  • Manuscripts [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 11 Archival Resource Key
    Oration by George Washington Lewis delivered at Westmoreland Courthouse
    1 folder(s)
    1836 July 4
  • Photographs [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 12 Archival Resource Key
    Photographs of the Lewis family
    1 folder(s)
    1904, 1906, 1966 and undated
    Scope and Contents

    Photographs of the Lewis family include: Robert Byrd Lewis and his wife, Laura Louisa Parran Lewis; George Lewis (son of Dr. Thomas M. Lewis) and Alice Maria Lewis Wallace (daughter of GWL); Henry Howell Lewis (brother of GWL), copy made in 1966; Mrs. Oliver Funsten, Lucy Lewis (daughter of GWL), copy made in 1966; "Claymont" home of Judge George W. Lewis and family; Judge George Washington Lewis; Henry Bankhead Lewis (1831-1862) son of GWL; cartes-de-visite of Robert Byrd Lewis; Dr. Thomas M. Lewis (son of GWL), copy made in 1966. Also includes a photograph of the coat of arms and motto of the Lewis family.

    Paper copies of photographs include one of "Shellfield," home of Samuel Lewis and birthplace of George W. Lewis; "Marmion," home of Daingerfield Lewis, King George County, Virginia, taken 1904 by Lucy Lewis Funsten; and a "View from the front porch of "Claymont," home of Judge George Washington Lewis, Westmoreland County, Virginia, taken by Lucy Lewis Funsten, July 1906.

  • Manuscripts [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 13 Archival Resource Key
    Plat of Hickory Hill, now "Claymont," Westmoreland County, Virginia, belonging to George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1835 March 17
  • Mixed Materials [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 14 Archival Resource Key
    Resolutions and Notices about the death of Judge George Washington Lewis
    1 folder(s)
    1879
  • Manuscripts [X032668027] box: 2 folder: 15 Archival Resource Key
    Will and Codicil of George Washington Lewis, hand-written copy
    1 folder(s)
    1871 September 29
  • Archival Resource Key
    Judith W. Lewis' copy of a letter made for a friend (oversize)
    1 folder(s)
    1805 September 14
    Scope and Contents

    This is a hand-written copy of a letter purporting to have been left by Jesus Christ sixty-five years after his crucifixion and found under a stone, 18 miles from Jerusalem. Judith W. Lewis sent this copy to her friend for inspirational purposes.